Firefighters’ Uniforms to Raise Awareness for Breast Cancer

October 7, 2016

 

Staff photo by David S. Morin From left: Captain Sean Mamone, Firefighters Andrew Gardner, Ben Crane, Kevin Blinn, Zach Whitney, Brian Clarnebach, Lieutenant Toby Provencol and Firefighter Mike Mallen.

Staff photo by David S. Morin From left: Captain Sean Mamone, Firefighters Andrew Gardner, Ben Crane, Kevin Blinn, Zach Whitney, Brian Clarnebach, Lieutenant Toby Provencol and Firefighter Mike Mallen.

by David S. Morin

The Hudson Fire Department will be wearing what looks to be the uniform T-shirts commonly found on firefighters, but, if you look closer, the caring these shirts signify will be obvious.  The lettering on the shirts is pink to show support for breast cancer awareness.  Crews will wear the shirts when on duty during the month of October.

This will be the fourth year the firefighters will display their support and honor all cancer patients and survivors.  The shirts are spearheaded by the Professional Firefighters of Hudson, with department members behind the program 100 percent.  The T-shirts are part of their work to promote good health and safety in the Hudson community.

According to Breastcancer.org, about one in eight U.S. women (about 12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.  In 2016, an estimated 246,660 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 61,000 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.

About 2,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men in 2016.  A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about one in 1,000.

Breast cancer incidence rates in the U.S. began decreasing in the year 2000, after increasing for the previous two decades.  They dropped by 7 percent from 2002 to 2003 alone.  One theory is that this decrease was partially due to the reduced use of hormone replacement therapy by women after the results of a large study called the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002.  These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

About 40,450 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2016 from breast cancer, though death rates have been decreasing since 1989.  Women under 50 have experienced larger decreases.  These decreases are thought to be the result of treatment advances, earlier detection through screening, and increased awareness.

For women in the U.S., breast cancer death rates are higher than those for any other cancer, besides lung cancer.

Awareness leads to detection, and early detection allows for greater options and increases the chances for survival, and that is the main goal of firefighters.

Hudson Fire Department breast cancer T-shirts are available for a donation of $20.  To purchase a shirt contact Firefighter Ben Crane at paracrine@gmail.com.  All proceeds will be donated to breast cancer research at the end of the month.